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T.S.O.L. released new album and music video for the track “I Wanted To See You”

Veteran rock / punk rock band T.S.O.L. have released a new music video for their song “I Wanted to See You”, coming off of their new album The Trigger Complex, released earlier this year via Rise Records. These boys have been keeping California punk rock alive since late 70s and the new records marks their 10th full length offerings! Watch the new video below and scroll down to check out the full album stream!

Photo by John Gilhooley.

Yes, they started as a punk band, but they never were confined to just playing one style. They did what felt right to them, no matter what the kids thought. They stuck to their ideals and they prove that they know what they are doing. The Trigger Complex is a varied and thrilling album that the band should be proud of and people should dig in and fill up on this full meal deal. / New Noise Magazine

Lyrics:

I got your taste in my mouth
I can’t stand it. I’m so strung out
I got your touch on my hand
I still feel it. Oh, baby, I’m your man
I can’t wait to see you.
Nothing here could be you.
I can’t wait all by myself
I can’t wait to see you
Nothing here could be you
I can’t wait all by myself

We’ve got sunny winter days
And I wanted to see you
And laughter in the pain
And I wanted to see you
And everything changed
And I wanted to see you now
Oh, they’ve taken everything
And I wanted to see you
and I wander through the day
And I wanted to see you
And it’s hard to stay away
I wanted to see you now.

I got your voice in my song
I still hear it. It won’t be long
I got your love on my mind
I still feel it. Oh, give me one more time
I can’t wait to see you.
Nothing here could be you.
I can’t wait all by myself
I can’t wait to see you
Nothing here could be you
I can’t wait all by myself

The tenth studio long-player from the mercurial L.A. punk legends, Trigger Complex is a muscular and melodic, hook-driven romp through the band’s myriad guises that strikes the perfect balance between convivial, nostalgic, and apoplectic. / AllMusic

The biggest mystery that emerges from The Trigger Complex is who this is actually for. It can hardly be for longtime T.S.O.L fans given the hard shift in genre, and anyone who is a fan of this sort of style is bound to be put off given the details that can be found by any brief search into the band’s origins. The only logical explanation is that this is an album made by a group of men who want to fuel the preconceptions that this is the direction that older bands should be going in, radio-friendly and inoffensive but utterly trite and boring, even though there are many bands out there that would be all too happy to disprove that. / The Soundboard

I can’t help but wonder if this new material is going to change their live show. I saw them as recently as last summer and they were still playing as a quartet. The vast majority of their setlist was from the early 80’s. The older the material, the more violent the reaction from the aging crowd. I can only imagine how a song like “Satellites” would go over in the pit. When TSOL changed their sound in the early 80’s, it’s safe to assume they were chasing fortune and fame. There’s little risk of a bunch of middle aged punks going mainstream this time around. They must be doing this because they want to. Grisham is a restless artistic soul. He’s written a couple of books and is a serious photographer in addition to his musical pursuits. The thought of trying to recreate “Abolish Government” or “Code Blue” a dozen more times for a new record probably didn’t appeal much to him. If that’s the only TSOL stuff you like, you should pass on this. If you can keep an open mind, there’s lots to like about The Trigger Complex. / PunkNews

With a fairly wide variety of tempos and moods, the new album features some arguably corny lyrical topics, but as usual, Jack has a way of stringing words together is such a cool way, it doesn’t really matter what the topic is.  The guy’s a poet, and damn fine one.  Additionally, he will never be able to shed that one-of-a-kind haunting tone to his voice.  These great qualities are all still in place!  The band has merely taken their years of experience and filtered it through a different colored lens that is far less focused on government, war, and death.  I’d go so far as to say that T.S.O.L. are straight up having fun on the album and it’s actually quite refreshing. / San Diego Punk

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