Interviews

LYMPHOMA TWINS discuss the U.S. social upheaval, DIY ethics, and more!

Lymphoma Twins
In the shadow of  far-right, racist protests and violence in the US and rising xenophobia, we sat down with Massachusetts’ dark, sludgy, experimental hardcore band LYMPHOMA TWINS to learn about their insider views on the tough subject, and discuss more encouraging and constructive topics like DIY ethics, developing through independent arts and touring.

As predicted, the current political climate created a visceral sense of creation and expression, letting us rediscover the driving and though-provoking forces of punk. LYMPHOMA TWINS‘ new experimental record ‘The Love and Light of Our Lord and Savior Jesus, the Christ‘ ties current affairs to a proper music soundtrack  Moreover, the debut EP finds its own footing apart from the genre connection, so it’s really worth a check. Scroll down to listen to the while thing, but first dive into the new chapter of our bizarre video interview series where interviewees are subjected to questioning at various intervals for a couple of weeks, resulting in a video where they appear in different locations and situations. Watch below to see for yourself.

LYMPHOMA TWINS are: Zach Staska- Drums/Vocals, P.J. Presti- Bass/Vocals, Javier Lom- Guitar/Vocals.

Questions asked:

1. Hey guys! Thanks for reaching out and welcome to IDIOTEQ! How are you? How’s Massachusetts doing?

2. How was the gig?

3. Nice. I’ve recently interviewed Paul from Tor Johnson where we touched on many many different aspects of that scene (see the feature here). Do you already have other touring plans for the coming months?

4. Considering your experience with this and previous bands, how does it feel to be on the road?

5. How do you view America from behind a car window pane?

6. How tough is it to be so close to the social confusion caused by the recent confrontations between white supremacists and anti-fascists in the States? Please give us some insider knowledge and view that might benefit our understanding this situation and the rise of nationalistic fever in your country.

7. Where does it come from? I mean, I understand the original, underlying philosophy and their stated missions, but what circumstances come together and shape these movements’ outrage these days?

8. What consequences of the current political climate do you think there may be for the community?

9. Some might say this year could be a wake up call, as well as one of the most prolific years in the history of engaged lyricism and politically conscious records. Does such content fuel your creative forces? What issues do you tackle on your new record? Where did you draw your inspiration from?

10. By the way your next record, apart from the lyrical part, how do you intend to expand your sound and maybe tackle a different approach to writing? Is it even important in your case? How do you approach composing and how do you think it’s important to evolve as musicians, even if you’re a punk band?

11. Alright, so I guess we’ve pretty much touched on all of the subjects I wanted to learn about you guys in our first direct encounter. Would you like to add anything else before we wrap up?

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