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“Terror. Panic. Run.” – SCATTERBOX brings back raw and intense emotions of 80s punk with new music video

Sure the provenance is stellar: somewhat up and out of the ashes of hardcore’s best and brightest, SCATTERBOX has their knotty roots almost knuckle deep into the heart of the fast and frenetic Sound of 1981. Featuring past and present members of Moral Crux (Lookout! Records) and the legendary Green Jelly (Green Jello), and a back catalog of full length albums, EP’s, soundtracks, and compilations spanning nearly 20 years, the band is back with a new music video for the track, “Terror. Panic. Run.” from their newest full length album, “RITUAL”.

The video is spastic and intense, which aligns with the overall mood and tone of the song. Plenty of flash cut shots coupled with some panic-heavy choppy editing effects, this video goes all-in. The video itself gets right to the point, touching on pandemic level fear and socio-political reactionism taking place in the current day. A straight-forward piece of direct hardcore punk with nothing left to the imagination.

The video was directed and shot by veteran director Jason Frost at Black State Productions. His previous work includes videos for The Accused AD, Capitalist Casualties, Year of the Cobra, and many more.

“The Ritual album rips from beginning to end, no apologies and no breaks on the tempo speed. This radioactive thrash blast comes courtesy of the Washington/Idaho border and sounds like a mutated update of Gang Green, Toxic Reasons, and classic Suicidal..” – Fear and Loathing in Long Beach

“They make hard music to play well look easy and sound like they fucking mean it in the process, which is much, much more than 98 percent of the things you’ll hear this week that’ll work their way into your brain pans. Hardcore the way hardcore was played when it meant something to play it.” – Eugene S. Robinson (Oxbow, Whipping Boy, Author, Ozy Magazine Editor)

Sure the provenance is stellar: somewhat up and out of the ashes of hardcore’s best and brightest, SCATTERBOX has their knotty roots almost knuckle deep into the heart of the fast and frenetic Sound of 1981. Which is where it should be placed if you had any sense, any sense of authenticity or any common sense at all. So, there are bullshit detectors and there are bullshit detectors and if you lived through 1981 the best ones are the ones on the sides of your head. You see the ears are what keep you from thinking [wrongly so] that any band AFTER 1983 was worth any sort of goddamned thing. Like dirty hippies and old jazzbos trying to tell you that ain’t shit happened after Janis or Miles, this type of logic comes from the gut. But it comes from the gut because the ears are not listening. Which is why this SCATTERBOX shit appeals so much. It has successfully tricked the ear of yesteryear that it’s at Ruthies, or the Wilson Center, or A7, or Rajis. It’s distilled all of what was cool about hearing this shit for the first time and managed to not make you feel bad about it THIS time. Fucking real deal? Goddamned right. Vintage AND new the music rises above the merely nostalgic to make you want to spray paint the walls, grab your skate, and fuck shit up. And with several and copious nods to post-punk sensibilities [via song titles, design aesthetic], it dawns that SCATTERBOX should be a lot bigger than they are with their heartfelt pre-post take on all of the loud fast rules. But they should be a lot of things probably: not living in Idaho, getting real and paying jobs, cutting out that racket. However, it would be our sincere hope that they continue existing for the sheer and pure fact that they make hard music to play well look easy and sound like they fucking mean it in the process, which is much, much more than 98 percent of the things you’ll hear this week that’ll work their way into your brain pans. Hardcore the way hardcore was played when it meant something to play it. We love these fucking guys. And you should too. – EUGENE S. ROBINSON (Author, Oxbow, Hydra Head Records)

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